SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY School of Medicine
Inet.slucare.edu | www.slucare.edu | cancercenter.slu.edu


Nutrition Home
Christina L. Popp, R.D., L.D.
Symptom Management
Nausea
Diarrhea
Constipation
Taste Changes
Dry Mouth
Salt-Free Herbs & Spices
Loss of Appetite
Food Safety
Proper Reheat Temps
HCHP Foods
(HCHP) Soft Foods
Recipes
Summer Meal
Milkshakes and Drinks
Winter Meal
Healthy Blueberry Muffins
Honey-Lime Tropical Salad
Hope Lodge
Liquid Nutrition Supplements
Christina's Recipe Corner
Mailing List
Links of Interest

High Calorie High Protein (HCHP) Soft Foods
Eating well on a soft, easy-to-swallow diet
There may be times when you cannot eat regular foods because it is difficult to chew or swallow them. It is still important to maintain your nutrition, so you may need to change to a softer diet consistency. Remember: you may not be able to eat the foods the way that you want them (for example, no country fried steak for a while), but you can eat almost all of the foods you had once eaten. Below is a list of high-calorie, high-protein soft foods .

High Calorie, High Protein SOFT Foods
DAIRY
MILK: whole, chocolate, or dry milk powder ICE CREAM CHEESE (soft, melted, cheese spread, ricotta, cottage cheese—whole milk, Velveeta) YOGURT—plain, flavored, in smoothies, or frozen
CUSTARD—cold or frozen PUDDING Instant Breakfast Powder
GRAINS
Dunk or soak bread Slurries
(Pour apple juice over pancakes, waffles, French toast to soak and soften)
MEATS, BEANS, EGGS
Ground or Pureed Meats Crab Salad Eggs Pureed beans or Bean dip
Soups Add strained baby meats to soups, sauces, gravies and strained vegetables
FRUITS - CANNED, FROZEN, or FRESH:
Peaches or Nectarines* Plums Pears* Apricots*
Mandarin oranges Blueberries Fruit cocktail Tropical fruit salad
Kiwi Bananas Watermelon Cantaloupe or honeydew
Juices COOKED: Apples*, Applesauce Cranberries* Cherries* & Berries, strained
VEGETABLES CANNED or COOKED:
Pumpkin Green beans Asparagus Peas*
Spinach & other greens: Kale, Collards, Turnip or Mustard Greens Sweet potatoes (baked, casserole, mashed) White, Yellow, Red, or Purple Potatoes (mashed, baked, in soups or stews) Pureed soup (such as cream of celery, asparagus, mushroom, or broccoli cheese)
Squash Tomatoes* Avocadoes
*SKINS MAY BE DIFFICULT TO SWALLOW

Large enough to make a difference. Small enough to care.
SLUCare The Physicians of Saint Louis University
Today is   Saturday, November 22, 2014
3635 Vista Ave. at Grand Blvd. || P.O. Box 15250
St. Louis, Mo 63110-0250
Phone: (314) 977-4440 or (866) 977-4440
slucare@slu.edu || Website Feedback